Saturday, August 27, 2016

Watch Sheriff SHOAR's Thuggish YouTube Video From Day After Dallas Shootings


Oddly, St. Augustine Record never covered it.  Wonder why?

Sheriff DAVID SHOAR's Hoary Political YouTube After Dallas Murders of Police Officers

More than 10,000 views on YouTube: Sheriff SHOAR is despicable, preaching hate and making incendiary statements. Enough.



In a "mad," rambling July 8, 2016 video, controversial St. Johns County Sheriff DAVID SHOAR f/k/a "HOAR" finally admits it: he's "mad."

Ipse dixit.

He can't fix it.

He's "mad."

Nothing about healing or reform or forgiveness or love or compassion.

He's mad.

He's sick.

Watch his bizarre video and take note:

3:45: Leaders are supposed to "take the high road" and "do the investigation."

But you didn't do that on September 2-3, 2010 when Michelle O'Connell was killed, Sheriff SHOAR.

Did you, Sheriff SHOAR f/k/a "HOAR?"

So you're "mad?"

You're politicizing a tragedy.  8:15

You're "in the sunset of [your] profession."   9:06

Thank God for small favors.

Yes, you're "in the sunset of [your] profession."   9:06

So is Congressman CORINNE BROWN, indicted the same day as your statement.

You''re under FBI investigation.

It's time for you to speak, under oath, before a federal grand jury.

Now.

You say you're not going to answer questions, just watch your dumb 'ole scripted video.

Reckon that includes his massage therapist filing to run as a "write-in," closing the universal primary, in violation of the Florida and U.S. Constitutions?

It's time for voters to vote you out of office.

I did not hear anything from your hateful, foaming mouth about police reform, love, compassion or healing.

What I heard was an irate evil man berating other people trying to heal our country.

Shameful people like you, Sheriff DAVID SHOAR have caused quite enough damage.





With a September 2, 2010 shooting of Michelle O'Connell in Deputy JEREMEY BANKS' home covered up, rebarbative Republican political boss, Sheriff DAVID SHOAR f/k/a "HOAR" refused to talk to The New York Times and PBS Frontline.
Wonder why?
Watch PBS documentary and read New York Times 11,000 word article on SHOAR's coverup, here
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/death-in-st-augustine/
http://www.nytimes.com/projects/2013/two-gunshots/ "Two Gunshots on a Summer Night," by Walt Bogdanich and Glenn Silver
For more on SHOAR and his record of violating citizens' constitutional rights, please  consult the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals decision in the Gennusa v. Canova case:  http://www.ca11.uscourts.gov/opinions/ops/201213871.pdf ,
and
http://www.nbcnews.com/dateline/full-episode-two-shots-fired-n84816 NBC News Dateline documentary, "Two Shots Fired"

The FBI investigation of Sheriff DAVID SHOAR continues. With Rep. CORINNE BROWN facing felony charges, the FBI is onto public corruption in Northeast Florida. No wonder Sheriff SHOAR, wearing makeup, delivered more than ten minutes of rambling non sequiturs on YouTube, or in his case, it should be called "You Rube."

Photo credit: Ancient City Weekly (via Facebook)


SHERIFF SHOAR's Nixonian July 8, 2016 "madman" speech is off the wall.  He needs a therapist and a priest.

Kindly compare RFK's April 4, 1968 speech in Indianapolis after Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  was shot and killed to our squalid, sordid Sheriff, apparently wearing makeup, who trivialized and tried to abuse Dallas for political purposes, stirring up hatred, in uniform, possibly violating the Hatch Act.

Here's what RFK said about healing, after Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was murdered:


I quoted some of these words at a candlelight vigil before hundreds on our Bayfront on June 13, 2016, the day after 49 Gay people were murdered in Orlando -- the same day that loutish Greater St. Augustine Republican Club Chairman MARTIN MILLER, an avid SHOAR supporter, called Mayoral candidate KRIS PHILLIPS' WFOY radio station program, hosted by KERRY McCARTHY, stating that the murder victims "got what they deserved."  RFK said, in the words I quoted at the Bayfront:

My favorite poem, my -- my favorite poet was Aeschylus. And he once wrote:
Even in our sleep, pain which cannot forget
falls drop by drop upon the heart,
until, in our own despair,
against our will,
comes wisdom
through the awful grace of God.
What we need in the United States is not division; what we need in the United States is not hatred; what we need in the United States is not violence and lawlessness, but is love, and wisdom, and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our country, whether they be white or whether they be black.

Talking about healing -- that's what Sheriff SHOAR should have said after Dallas, instead of the mad, mewling, mean-spirited politicized speech he gave about being mad.

Is Sheriff SHOAR insane?  You tell me.

He's obviously a bad person, one unworthy of your trust, confidence or vote.

He's mad.  Should a madman be Sheriff?

Hillary Clinton says the world needs more "love and kindness."

"What the world needs now, is love, sweet love," not a madman for a Sheriff.

Here's the full text of what RFK said.


[AUTHENTICITY CERTIFIED: Text version below transcribed directly from audio. (2)]
Ladies and Gentlemen, 
I'm only going to talk to you just for a minute or so this evening, because I have some -- some very sad news for all of you -- Could you lower those signs, please? -- I have some very sad news for all of you, and, I think, sad news for all of our fellow citizens, and people who love peace all over the world; and that is that Martin Luther King was shot and was killed tonight in Memphis, Tennessee.
Martin Luther King dedicated his life to love and to justice between fellow human beings. He died in the cause of that effort. In this difficult day, in this difficult time for the United States, it's perhaps well to ask what kind of a nation we are and what direction we want to move in. For those of you who are black -- considering the evidence evidently is that there were white people who were responsible -- you can be filled with bitterness, and with hatred, and a desire for revenge.
We can move in that direction as a country, in greater polarization -- black people amongst blacks, and white amongst whites, filled with hatred toward one another. Or we can make an effort, as Martin Luther King did, to understand, and to comprehend, and replace that violence, that stain of bloodshed that has spread across our land, with an effort to understand, compassion, and love.
For those of you who are black and are tempted to fill with -- be filled with hatred and mistrust of the injustice of such an act, against all white people, I would only say that I can also feel in my own heart the same kind of feeling. I had a member of my family killed, but he was killed by a white man.
But we have to make an effort in the United States. We have to make an effort to understand, to get beyond, or go beyond these rather difficult times.
My favorite poem, my -- my favorite poet was Aeschylus. And he once wrote:
Even in our sleep, pain which cannot forget
falls drop by drop upon the heart,
until, in our own despair,
against our will,
comes wisdom
through the awful grace of God.
What we need in the United States is not division; what we need in the United States is not hatred; what we need in the United States is not violence and lawlessness, but is love, and wisdom, and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our country, whether they be white or whether they be black.
So I ask you tonight to return home, to say a prayer for the family of Martin Luther King -- yeah, it's true -- but more importantly to say a prayer for our own country, which all of us love -- a prayer for understanding and that compassion of which I spoke.
We can do well in this country. We will have difficult times. We've had difficult times in the past, but we -- and we will have difficult times in the future. It is not the end of violence; it is not the end of lawlessness; and it's not the end of disorder.
But the vast majority of white people and the vast majority of black people in this country want to live together, want to improve the quality of our life, and want justice for all human beings that abide in our land.
And let's dedicate ourselves to what the Greeks wrote so many years ago: to tame the savageness of man and make gentle the life of this world. Let us dedicate ourselves to that, and say a prayer for our country and for our people.
Thank you very much.

2 comments:

Henry Mendoza said...

How is this thuggish? He said nothing but the truth.

Ed Slavin said...

Incendiary, angry, divisive, unprofessional ukase -- not a word about calming fears or promoting healing. Not truth -- meanness. I will pray for you.